The Water Pollution Control Program regulates all phases of waste-water disposal in the County.  Engineering plans are reviewed and approved for the installation of sewer main extensions.  Plans for individual subsurface disposal systems (SDS) are reviewed and approved after an initial field investigation to assess site conditions.  The installations are inspected to ensure proper construction and homeowners are given a Certificate of Approval, which includes a drawing of the septic system with measurements so that the system can be located in the future for maintenance purposes.  Water pollution complaints are investigated and municipal water pollution control plants are inspected regularly.

New York State Realty Subdivision Laws (Public Health Law and Environmental Conservation Law) requires that subdivisions of 5 lots or more obtain Department of Health approval.  If a property is subdivided into less than 5 lots, but additional lots are created by subdividing within a three-year period so that the total number of lots is equal to or greater than 5, Department approval is then needed.

The Department has also been delegated the authority to approve all sewer extensions by the NYSDEC.  In addition, the Department also approves "private" collection systems found in such places as condominium complexes and office parks.

The Department also oversees the investigation of construction related stormwater management complaints in cooperation with the NYSDEC.  Technical support is provided to the Mosquito Control Program in the review of stormwater management plans.

Septic System Design and Installation

septic2.jpgPlans for individual subsurface disposal systems, better known as septic systems, are reviewed and approved by the Department of Health after an initial field investigation to assess site conditions.  The on-site assessments are performed by the property owner's engineer and must be witnessed by a Department representative.

All Septic systems must be designed by a Licensed Professional Engineer or Registered Architect. For residential construction, systems are designed in accordance with New York State Department of Health's Appendix 75-A and it's companion document, Residential Onsite Wastewater Treatment Design Handbook. For all other construction, design is per New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's Design Standards. Additional requirements can be found in Article IV of the Rockland County Sanitary Code.

The installations are inspected by the Department of Health to ensure proper construction and property owners are given a Certificate of Approval, which includes an "as-built" drawing of the septic system with measurements so that the system can be located in the future for maintenance purposes.

If you own a home served by a septic system, the Homeowner's Guide to Septic Systems provides information on how a septic system functions and how to properly maintain your system.

For additional information, please call 845-364-2656.

Septic System Failures

Typical pollutants in household wastewater septic1.jpgare nitrogen, phosphorus, and disease-causing bacteria and viruses. When a system fails, these pollutants can end up on the ground surface or into our streams and other water bodies. If you have a system that is not functioning properly, the Department can provide technical guidance in getting your system repaired or replaced.



Septic system repairs or replacement can be very costly. The EPA's Homeowners Guide to Septic Systems provides information on how to properly maintain your system and avoid these costs.

For additional information, please call 845-364-2656.

Sewage Overflows

sewage1.jpgOverflowing manholes in the public sewer system usually result in untreated sewage ultimately entering our streams and waterways.  These overflows are often caused by blockages from grease or debris not meant to be conveyed by the system. Your help in not flushing diapers, rags, etc. down the toilet or pouring grease down the sink will help to minimize these overflows. If you see an overflowing manhole, call the local Town or Village since the systems are usually maintained by the municipality. 

To report a spill of any type, call the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Spill Hotline at 1-800-457-7362.

 




Sewage Treatment Plant Inspections

There are 6 major Sewage Treatment Plants in Rockland County. These plants are regulated under a State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES) Permit issued by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Under a delegation agreement with the DEC, the Department makes periodic inspections of these facilities to ensure compliance with their SPDES Permit.

For additional information, please call 845-364-2656.